A partial history of the family of N. C. Harmon. (My father.) From the time John Harmon first came from England 1635

Editors note: Five pages of history of the Smith and Waugh Geneology are scanned in as an image. The OCR software could not read much of what follows due to the poor quality of the original. This was prepared by Arlisle M. Smith. Unknown date of origin.

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John Harmon, primus, born in 1617 in England came to this country in 1635 and settled in Pewlet, Vt. Second generation, Joseph, son of John-- third generation, Nathaniel, son of Joseph, fourth generation, Phinias, son of Nathaniel--fifth generation, Thaddeus, son of Phinias, sixth generation, Thaddeus (grandpa Harmon) son of Thaddeus, born March 1, 1790 in Pawlet, Vt., where he was raised to early manhood receiving a common school education. He moved from there to Pulaski, N. Y. at the age of 16 years. He was on e of the pioneers of that country. On March 22, 1815, he was married to Betsy Waugh (Grandma Harmon) oldest daughter of Dan Waugh and Irene Smedley Waugh of Litchfield, Conn.

After living here for several years and bringing up a family of four sons and two daughters, all being farmers, they decided to look for some place where they could secure more land, so in the year 1844 they boarded a propellor at Buffalo - about the only means of transportation at that time. After a trip lasting 22 days, they landed at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Here they thought of locating at first, but after a few days changed their minds and loading their household goods into a lumber wagon drawn by ox teams, they started for Sheboygan County. They were accompanied by the John Parrish family most the way. They had only an Indian trail to follow. The journey was hazardous and tedious, but full of interesting experiences. On reaching the Milwaukee River near Saukville they found the stream much swollen and running full banks. Row to get across was a problem, but there were many Indians around who seemed friendly, and they finally persuaded them to let them use their canoes to paddle the women and children across. They then swam the oxen across and drew the wagons over with ropes. The rain fell in torrents most of the time, and the women were often obliged to lighten the load by walking so the teams could draw the loaded wagons which often sank to the hubs in mud.
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A partial history of the family of John Harmon: Page 1.

Page 1 (above). Page 2 (below)

A partial history of the family of John Harmon: Page 2.

The Waugh Genealogy

A partial history of the family of John Waugh: Page 1.

Page 1 (above). Page 2 (below)

A partial history of the family of John Waugh: Page 2.

Third page of the Waugh geneology (below).

A partial history of the family of John Waugh: Page 3.