This is a series of three articles on the launching and capabilities of the Oliver H. Smith.


Wisconsin's Oliver H. Smith Proves a Fast Tug

1944 circa
Atlantic Fisherman

The new 52' fishing tug "Oliver H. Smith", owned by Smith Bros. of Port Washington, Wis. This increases to eight the number of boats which the Company operates on Lakes Michigan, Superior and Huron.

Wisconsin's "Oliver H. Smith" Proves A Fast Tug The welded steel 52' fishing tug Oliver H. Smith, recently completed by Kewaunee Shipbuilding & Engineering Corp., Kewaunee, Wisconsin for Smith Bros. of Port Washington, Wisconsin, embodies a number of new features in construction and equipment. She was designed by Walter W. Haertel, naval architect for the Kewaunee yard and designer of over 50 successful Great Lakes fishing vessels during the past 17 years.

The basic hull design was evolved in 1933 and was first used in the construction of the 47-foot, welded steel fish tug Energy built for Tom and George Johnson of Waukegan, Illinois. Several other boats of both wood and steel construction were built, using the same general hull lines—the largest being the 55-foot Pennsylvania State Fisheries Patrol Boat built in 1942. This boat is now the U. S. Coast Guard Fire Tug Vigilant stationed at Duluth, Minnesota.

The hull lines of the new boat follow those of the Vigilant very closely, except that a new type of transom has been used with rounded corners to overcome the tendency to damage at these corners around docks and other vessels. The bow lines are well flared and a wide fender, in addition, helps to throw the seas outward, resulting in a very dry boat.

The main engine is a Gray-Six cylinder Model "64" rated at 165 hp. at 2000 rpm., driving a 36 x 34 Michigan High Tensile Bronze Wheel through a 3 to 1 reduction gear. The entire engine space is enclosed in portable sections of accoustic insulation and sheathing, which considerably reduces engine noises. The exhaust passes through a Model STC 5" Burgess Snubber and out the transom. The propeller shaft is of special steel fitted with re-newable bronze liners in way of the bearings and a Goodrich cutless stern bearing is used.

Fuel is carried in two built-in wing tanks each holding 320 gallons. The engine is fitted with a heat exchanger and complete closed cooling system. A 32 volt 1500 watt generator, mounted on the main engine provides current for lights and an electric bilge pump and is used also to charge a bank of heavy duty Willard storage batteries. The net lifter is a Crossley No. 132 driven by a Briggs and Stratton gasoline engine.

Steering wheels are located at the pilot house and at the lifter door in the usual manner, with Columbian drop handle type reverse controls at both stations. A Sperry Hydraulic type throttle control is mounted in the pilot house.

A centrifugal type air compressor is driven off the forward end of the engine by a Vee belt and furnishes air for the Kahlenberg D-2 Super air horn installed on top of the pilot house. In addi-tion an air line is piped to the sea chest for blowing out.

A Jabsco rubber impeller bilge pump is driven off the propeller shaft by means of a Vee-belt and another similar pump is direct connected to a 1/4 hp. electric motor for general service.

Ventilation and light for the deckhouse and pilothouse are se-cured through cast bronze portlights and deadlights. All doors are of an improved sliding type, closing on rubber gaskets. The entire pilothouse and the underside of the deckhouse roof are insulated and sheathed to overcome sweating in cold weather.
Original article:


New Lake Michingan Fishing Boat

Commercial work is finding its way very gradually into the nation's shipyards, although they are still going full speed on Army, Navy or Maritime Commission contracts. The first commercial work ever done by the Kewaunee Ship¬building and Engineerinc,b Corp. Kewaunee, Wis., was the building of two small fishing boats for the Great Lakes. This yard was established in 1942.

The OLIVER H. SMITH was built for Smith Bros. of Port Washington, Wis., one of the leading commercial fishing companies on the Great Lakes.

This boat, which embodies a num¬ber of new features in construction and equipment, was designed by Wal¬ter W. Haertel, Naval Architect for the Kewaunee yard and designer of over 50 successful Great Lakes fish¬ing vessels during the past 17 years.

The basic hull design was evolved in 1933 and was first used in the con-struction of the 47-foot, welded steel fish tug ENERGY built for Tom and George Johnson of Waukegan, Ill., by the Kenosha Boiler and Structural Co. early in 1934. Several other boats of both wood and steel construction were built, using the same general hull lines—the largest being the 55-foot Pennsylvania State Fish- ties patrol boat built in 1942 by .- tie American Boiler Works at Erie, lennsylvania. This boat is now the U. S. Coast Guard fire tug VIGILANT stationed at Duluth, Minn.

The hull lines of the new boat follow those of the VIGILANT very closely, except that a new type of transom has been used with rounded corners to overcome the tendency to damage at these corners around docks and other vessels. The bow lines are well flared and a wide fender helps to throw the seas outward, resulting in a very dry boat.

The general arrangement and equip-ment deils were worked out between the owner and designer and are the result of many years of practical ex¬perience.

The train engine is a Gray six-cyl-inder Medel "64" rated at 165 hn. a: 2000 r.p driving a 36 x 34 Michigan high :ensile bronze wheel through a 3 to 1 reduction gear. The entire engine srace is enclosed in portabie sections Johns-Manville aoxtustic insulation and sheathing, which considerably reduces engine noises. The exhaust rasses through a Model STC 5-in. Burgess snubber and out the transom. The propeller shaft is of special -seel fitted with renewable bronze liners in way of the bearings and a Gxdrich cutless stern bearing is used.

Fuel is carried in two built-in wing tanks each holding 333 gallons. The engine is fitted with a heat exchanger and cornBlete closed cooling system. A 32-volt 1500-wattgenerator mounted on the main engine provides current for lights and an electric bilge pump, and is used also to charge a bank of heavy duty Willard storage batteries.

The net lifter is a Crossley No. 132 driven by a Briggs and Stratton gasoline engine.

Steering wheels are located in the pilot house and at the lifter door in the usual manner, with Columbian drop handle type reverse controls at both tions. A Sperry hydraulic type throttle com:roi is mounted in the pilot house_

A Wagner centrifugal type air cormpressor is driven off the forward end :he engine by a Vee-belt and fur- air for the Kahlenberg D-2 Su-per air horn installed on top of the pilot house. In addition an air line is piped to the sea chest for blowing out and a utility connection provides air for any other purpose desired.

A Tabsco rubber impeller bilge pump is driven off the propeller shaft by means of a Vee-belt and another similar pump is direct connected to a '4-hp. electric motor for general ser¬ice.

Ventilation and light for the deck house and pilot house are secured through cast bronze portlights and deadlights supplied by the H. E. Bre¬mer Mfg. Co. of Milwaukee. All doors are of an improved sliding type, closing on rubber gaskets.

The entire pilot house and the un-derside of the deck house roof are insulated and sheathed with Johns- Manville materials to overcome sweating in cold weather.

Preliminary trials over a measured mile course show a top speed in excess of 12 miles per hour and a regular running speed of 11 m.p.h. is easily obtained.

This boat went directly from the 'builder's yard to her home port and has been fishing since October 2. All reports from the owners are extreme¬ly favorable and it is expected that a great deal of interest will be shown in this faster, more efficient type.

Another boat of the same design is being completed for Lelond La Fond of Milwaukee and will soon be put into service. This boat is powered with a 150 hp. Murphy Diesel and has a number of features differing from the Smith boat, but the hull and deck house are identical.

The Kewaunee Shipbuilding and Engineering Corporation has been building steel ships for the U. S. Army Transportation Corps since their yard was started in the summer of 1942, and has gained a reputation for good ships delivered on time. They were awarded the Army-Navy "E" for excellence in production last July.




Latest Addition To Smith Fleet Awaits Launching

Port Washington. — The first large steel boat to be allocated to civilian use since the start of the war, the Oliver H. Smith, latest adjunct to the Smith Bros. fleet, will slide down the ways at the Kewaunee Shipbuilding and Engineering corporation yards next Monday. It will be sponsored by Mrs. Oliver Smith, with members of the Port Washington city - council and others of this city in attendance.

The new boat, of all-steel welded construction, is powered by a Gray Marine Diesel engine, also carrying the numeral 1 which sig¬nifies it the first to be built for civilian use under wartime restrictions.

The 51-foot nine-inch ship will go into operation here about Oct. 1. It has a beam of 14 feet six inches, drawing six feet amidships and five feet aft. Its average speed will be near 12 miles an hour.

Captain Richard Nagrocki of this city will be in charge of the new boat, which replaces the Evelyn C. Smith recently sold to a commercial fishing firm in Waukegan, Ill.